Romans 8:28 Pillar of Eternal Security

I have been meditating on Christ’s promises to His people that He will never leave us or forsake us (Matt. 28:20; Heb. 13:5-6).

John 10

John 10

In my decade long life in Christ, I have learned much and grown much in my knowledge of the Bible, but nothing has comforted me and created more joy in me than the promise that I cannot lose the grace of forgiveness that God has given me.

I want to hone in on Romans 8:28. In regarding this verse of Scripture, we can see that the clear testimony of the Holy Spirit is that those He has called are never lost, but will always remain the people of Christ. Let’s soak in this joy together.

Three excellent translations of the verse:

28 And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose. (NASB)

28 And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose. (NKJV)

28 And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose. (ESV)

The NASB draws from a slightly different ancient manuscript tradition than the NKJV and ESV. Let’s look at it first before the latter two, treating the three as a harmony, and like a jewel being turned in the light.

Lil’ Exegesis

1) NASB

“And we know that…” Paul/the Holy Spirit is giving us assurance of the knowledge of the information in this clause. For the Christian, there is no doubting what will be said hereafter.

“…God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God…” So then, for the Christian, we can always fall back on this sure knowledge: there is nothing outside of “all things” – and praise God, He “causes” everything that happens to “work together for good” for His people. Nothing is outside of God’s sovereign, gracious control. When there are calamities both within our lives and in the world at large, God is actively orchestrating and allowing these “all things” for the good of “those who love God,” which is another way of saying “Christians.” Continue reading

A Pastoral Application of John 1:1-18

This will compliment my exegesis of the text, which I posted last week. Click here to read it.

I hope this will offer some encouragement and joy to you as you read and ponder, with an open Bible next to you.

Grace in Christ,

-Justin

An Eternal Person Created Everything

John’s Gospel begins with a prologue of raw divine revelation. Just as Genesis begins the entire Old Testament with “In the beginning,” so John boldly begins his Gospel with the same declaration. This is a revelation of no one less than God. This is serious business—it’s divine business. When Jesus was dying, he cried out “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me” (Matt. 27:46 HCSB). His quotation of Psalm 22:1 would have stirred his hearers to think of the entire Psalm, just as John’s use of Genesis 1:1 connects his readers with the entire creation narrative.

The author here would have us make no mistakes about who Jesus was and is—“the Word was God,” and also, “all things were made through him” (John 1:1b, 1:3a ESV). The one who is the Word is an eternal person, and he was there with God in the beginning of all things. We see here that an eternal person created everything including you and me. That person, we find out a little further down, is Jesus, the Son of the Father (John 1:14).

The Word has Been Arriving into His World

            This world seems to be under a terrible curse. Eight years ago we saw 250,000 people die in a tsunami, nations are in perpetual war, each year there is extinction of numerous, irreplaceable species; and so we wonder how a God of love could be any part of it all. The Church often speaks with contradictory voices when suffering and death visit us. People are desperate for help. It is into this maelstrom that John speaks: “In him was life, and the life was the light of men” (1:4). This is light from life for humans who languish in darkness and death. It is light that shines in our darkness, shining so that it cannot be overcome by the darkness (1:5).

This is John’s way of telling us that the eternal person who created everything was also filtering into our world long before his Incarnation—filtering down through the depths of darkness like the morning sun reaching the bottom of some great lake. John the Baptist was used by God to announce the coming of the light into the world. In this historical figure, we latch onto the historicity of John’s prologue. This is not a myth created by some wine-soaked Greek hill-dweller. No, John the Baptist stepped into the spotlight of redemptive history to speak; his voice reaching not only the tympanic membranes of a couple hundred Israelites, but he being dead yet speaks to hundreds of generations since. He bears witness about the light of Jesus, the light that has been illuminating all people throughout history. The redemptive historical narrative of Israel reveals his true identity and mission. He was coming into his broken world, a world filled with human darkness—with his coming there is hope for humankind and there is a divine purpose behind every evil thing, (most clearly seen in the cross).

The author of this prologue makes clear that “the true light . . . was coming into the world” (1:9). There is conflict here, yet again, like in v. 5 where we see darkness that would overcome the light of life. In vv. 10-11, the irony is stated outright—the world that he made was ignorant of him, though like the daylight that covers our physical planet, he covers our metaphysical world with his presence. Before his Incarnation, the Word of life had been revealed in the world of Gentiles through the light of conscience, yet he had come especially to the Hebrew people. Among all of this history, John highlights the mercy of God in vv. 12-13: by the gracious will of God, many received the Word and became his children.

The Word as a Man… For Us

            By the time John brings us to v. 14, we have seen that God’s light had been infiltrating the world of human darkness and granting new birth to everyone who received him. Now, however, we see a new stage of God’s work among humans. He becomes one of us. The Word came into the darkness, no longer as a light in Torah, or in conscience, or in the book of nature, but in the flesh. This is the unique Son of the Father; his sonship indicates a potential adoption for each one of us. This is the good news the Church possesses, and this is the gospel that we need in order to continue lives of hopefulness and joy in a world of cascading sadness. God did not remain distant, cold, or disinterested. His presence and coming into our world has been happening in greater and greater movements since the days of our first parents. His is a posture of concern, care, and indeed, divine love for a race of mutilated, sin-slain creatures.

Often the most difficult thing for any of us is to look at those who are badly injured by some tragedy. People who have some deformity go through life watching the silent reactions of everyone around them, feeling isolated and alone. When God looked at his human creature, the disfigurement was far more wrenching than any missing limb or skin rash that we have ever seen. In his omniscience, God was looking at pure unholiness. We had become what he hates. In the mythological tradition, this might be the point in the plot when God utters his disgust and closes the book on the world. In the objective history of what he actually has done, it is the opposite. While he does execute wrath, he yet remembers mercy all along the way.

“And we have seen his glory” (1:14b), and his glory includes his being “full of grace and truth” (1:14c). As he closes out his prologue, John declares world peace for all who will receive him and believe in his name. For this one to come, full of grace for the graceless, and full of truth for those caught in lies is the greatest act of love. He has been pouring out his fullness ever since, and the grace which replaces previous grace is most clearly seen as he lays down his perfect life in the stead of us, his people. Jesus fulfilled all of the previous graces God had given the world. Jesus is the ambassador of God to humankind, and the representative of humankind to God. He is the perfect mediator.

And all of this reveals the very heart of God—the place John ends out his beginning. Jesus is in the very heart of God, in the Father’s κόλπον (closest embrace). The Son is in the place of greatest intimacy with God, and he is there for you. He is your intercessor. He is here with us. He is the one who never leaves us or forsakes us. He is our great Shepherd, the one who loves unconditionally, and into our world he came so that we might touch God and be healed. He is the Word of God with us. He is the Word of God for us in the abiding darkness of this world, a darkness that cannot overcome his light.

Old Testament on Jesus’ Resurrection

I am pretty sure the internet is devoid of commentary on prophecy (that’s sarcasm, folks), so I’d better throw in a (just a pinch today) of red-hot, mind-blowing prophetic power to light up your life.

Green Red Hot Peppers

Prophesy Friday is my attempt to counteract some of the atrocious sea of false prophecy and sensationalism out there. If these posts are a blessing to you, please consider sharing them with a friend.

…the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy. Rev. 19:10

Let’s strengthen our mutual faith together, brothers and sisters. Foresight and clarity of Bible prophecy is one of (if not the) greatest means of growing in our faith in the true God.

In light of this past Resurrection Sunday, I’d like to highlight two passages of Old Testament Scripture that speak of the resurrection of Jesus.

1000 Years Before the Resurrection

As Peter preached his first Spirit-filled sermon on the day of Pentecost, he flourishes about his best friend Jesus, saying

Men of Israel, hear these words: Jesus of Nazareth, a Man attested by God to you by miracles, wonders, and signs which God did through Him in your midst, as you yourselves also know—23 Him, being delivered by the determined purpose and foreknowledge of God, you have taken by lawless hands, have crucified, and put to death; 24 whom God raised up, having loosed the pains of death, because it was not possible that He should be held by it. 25 For David says concerning Him:

‘I foresaw the Lord always before my face,
For He is at my right hand, that I may not be shaken.
26 Therefore my heart rejoiced, and my tongue was glad;
Moreover my flesh also will rest in hope.
27 For You will not leave my soul in Hades,
Nor will You allow Your Holy One to see corruption.
28 You have made known to me the ways of life;
You will make me full of joy in Your presence’ (Acts 2:22-28 NKJV).

There in verse 27, he quotes from Psalm 16, written 1,000 years before the resurrection. The Holy Spirit gave a glorious, though veiled reference to this central event in the victory of Jesus over sin, death, and the devil. This sermon of Peter’s was perfect, pure, and right in every way (having been written down as Scripture, it cannot be anything else), and he rightly cited the prophecy of David in writing about the resurrection of Jesus in veiled terms so long before.

750 Years Before the Resurrection

As with last week’s Prophecy Friday, Isaiah 53 is the controlling text of Old Testament prophecy about Jesus. Within this glorious passage, Jesus stands tall upon His atoning cross, and rises high from His grave. Look with me at 7-10a

7 He was oppressed and He was afflicted,
Yet He opened not His mouth;
He was led as a lamb to the slaughter, (to be killed)
And as a sheep before its shearers is silent,
So He opened not His mouth.
He was taken from prison and from judgment,
And who will declare His generation?
For He was cut off from the land of the living; (He died)

For the transgressions of My people He was stricken. (He died in our place)

And they made His grave with the wicked— (He was buried)

But with the rich at His death,
Because He had done no violence,
Nor was any deceit in His mouth.

10 Yet it pleased Yahweh to bruise Him;
He has put Him to grief. (God punished Jesus in our place to set us free)

OK, see all that? He died under the penalty we deserved. He was buried as a corpse.

But then Isaiah sees something strange, verses 10b-12

10 When You make His soul an offering for sin, (His life in the stead of ours, His pure, infinite life as a sin-offering for the impure, finite people He came to redeem)

He shall see His seed, He shall prolong His days, (How does someone who dies live to see a prolonging of His days?)

And the pleasure of Yahweh shall prosper in His hand.
11 He shall see the labor of His soul,and be satisfied.
By His knowledge My righteous Servant shall justify many,
For He shall bear their iniquities. (There it is right there, friends. He both dies, and yet He lives. There is only one way for this to happen: resurrection)

12 Therefore I will divide Him a portion with the great,
And He shall divide the spoil with the strong,
Because He poured out His soul unto death,
And He was numbered with the transgressors,
And He bore the sin of many,
And made intercession for the transgressors.

Glory to the risen Lamb. Read and re-read until a fire catches in your soul. Jesus lives.

Thanks for reading,

-Justin

Beautiful Atonement: Prophesy Good Friday

Prophesy Friday is my attempt to counteract some of the atrocious sea of false prophecy and sensationalism out there. If these posts are a blessing to you, please consider sharing them with a friend.

For this Good Friday, it is only appropriate to call upon the greatest Old Testament prophecy about Jesus. Isaiah chapter 52:13-53:12 is the beautiful picture of the suffering Servant of Yahweh, the One who would be crushed for our iniquities.

Written 700 years before the first Good Friday, Isaiah had the honor of spelling out the means of God’s redemption of Israel. He would lay on Jesus the iniquity of us all.

Read with me the bare naked words of this prophecy, and read them aloud if possible. Read them slowly, with contemplation… and if you have trusted in the Lord Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, read with gratitude. If you have not, here is proof that the Bible is supernatural, for how did a man write these words 700 years before they came true? Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and be baptized for the remission of sins.

I’ve included just a few words in the text [in brackets] which clarify a few obscure terms.

Rejoice.

Isaiah 52:13-53:12 (NKJV)

13 Behold, My Servant shall deal prudently;
He shall be exalted and extolled and be very high.
14 Just as many were astonished at you,
So His visage[face] was marred more than any man,
And His form more than the sons of men;
15 So shall He sprinkle many nations.
Kings shall shut their mouths at Him;
For what had not been told them they shall see,
And what they had not heard they shall consider.

1 Who has believed our report?

And to whom has the arm of Yahweh been revealed?

For He shall grow up before Him as a tender plant,
And as a root out of dry ground.
He has no form or comeliness[beauty];
And when we see Him,
There is no beauty that we should desire Him.
He is despised and rejected by men,
A Man of sorrows and acquainted with grief.
And we hid, as it were, our faces from Him;
He was despised, and we did not esteem Him.

Surely He has borne our griefs
And carried our sorrows;
Yet we esteemed Him stricken,
Smitten by God, and afflicted.
But He was wounded for our transgressions,
He was bruised for our iniquities;
The chastisement[punishment] for our peace was upon Him,
And by His stripes we are healed.
All we like sheep have gone astray;
We have turned, every one, to his own way;
And Yahweh has laid on Him the iniquity of us all.

He was oppressed and He was afflicted,
Yet He opened not His mouth;
He was led as a lamb to the slaughter,
And as a sheep before its shearers is silent,
So He opened not His mouth.
He was taken from prison and from judgment,
And who will declare His generation?
For He was cut off from the land of the living;
For the transgressions of My people He was stricken.
And they made His grave with the wicked—
But with the rich at His death,
Because He had done no violence,
Nor was any deceit in His mouth.

10 Yet it pleased Yahweh to crush Him;
He has put Him to grief.
When You make His soul an offering for sin,
He shall see His seed, He shall prolong His days,
And the pleasure of Yahweh shall prosper in His hand.
11 He shall see the labor of His soul, and be satisfied.
By His knowledge My righteous Servant shall justify many,
For He shall bear their iniquities.
12 Therefore I will divide Him a portion with the great,
And He shall divide the spoil with the strong,
Because He poured out His soul unto death,
And He was numbered with the transgressors,
And He bore the sin of many,
And made intercession for the transgressors.

Good Friday

Glory to the Name of Jesus! Suffering Lamb of God! Died He for me, that I may live, and died He to bring me close to Him!

The cross of Jesus is precious because by it we get Jesus forever.

Thanks for reading,

-Justin

No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draws him. – Jesus

Since I’m a novice in Koine Greek, I wouldn’t yet try my own posts concerning exegesis of the original New Testament, but I can recognize a home-run when I see it. Enjoy (great blog over at treyjasso.com).

Seeking Understanding

This is a popular text that I believe is a great starting point in the discussion of God’s effectual work. It is in the Gospel of John 6:44.

I was talking about this verse with someone last night. And I pointed to this verse to help this person understand why I held the view that man has no ability to come to God on his own. That is another way of saying that man possesses an “inability”. The person challenged my understanding of the verse so now I would respond at length to demonstrate that if you want to hold to a view of Prevenient Grace or that all humanity possess an ability, this isn’t the place to look.

First we look at this in the Greek: John 6:44  οὐδεὶς δύναται ἐλθεῖν πρός με ἐὰν μὴ ὁ πατὴρ ὁ πέμψας με ἑλκύσῃ 
αὐτόν,κἀγὼἀναστήσω αὐτὸν ἐν τῇ ἐσχάτῃ ἡμέρᾳ. 

View original post 495 more words

Jesus Claims to be God: Prophesy Fridays

I am pretty sure the internet is devoid of commentary on prophecy (that’s sarcasm, folks), so I’d better throw in a dash of red-hot, mind-blowing prophetic power to light up your life.

Prophesy Friday is my attempt to counteract some of the atrocious sea of false prophecy and sensationalism out there. If these posts are a blessing to you, please consider sharing them with a friend.

…the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy. Rev. 19:10

Let’s strengthen our mutual faith together, brothers and sisters. Foresight and clarity of Bible prophecy is one of (if not the) greatest means of growing in our faith in the true God.

Picking on Poor Old Mark

One of the more intense opponents of Christianity is Bart Ehrman, a prolific author and scholar of the Bible. Ehrman works tirelessly to disabuse Christians of the notion that the Bible is a reliable historical record of anything that actually happened in first-century Palestine. In his critique of the four Gospels, Ehrman (along with the majority of modern scholarship) notes that the Gospel of Mark appears to be the earliest of the four. A part of this conclusion is the “underdeveloped” Christology of Mark – in other words, Mark sees a rather plain, human Jesus. Mark’s Jesus, according to Ehrman, is a man, nothing more, and perhaps had some extraordinary signs surrounding his ministry, but by the time the Gospel of John is written decades later, the plain-Jane Jesus of Mark has been morphed into a God.

For Ehrman and his ilk, the true Jesus was more like the one found in Mark than anywhere else. I have even watched as Muslim critics of Christianity have begun to take up Ehrman’s arguments against the historicity of the Gospels on this very basis.

shabir allyShabir Ally, a gentleman from Canada, in debating against Dr. James White, used Ehrman’s theory of a developing Christology from Mark through John to try and debunk any true witness to Jesus’ deity in the Gospel accounts. Never mind that if Shabir and the modern Muslim apologists used the same exact critical tools against the Quran, that it would be even more so than the Bible vulnerable to being debunked… but that’s another story.

So, are they right? Does Mark present the more authentic Jesus? I mean, being authentic is the greatest virtue of our age, and being a fake the worst sin, right?

Jesus Sets the Record Straight

Without delving into a major critical response to Ehrman/Ally, I must say that their thesis is empty. Even if we allow that Mark is the earliest account of Jesus’ life and ministry, there is no less the deity of Christ here than in the other two synoptic Gospels.

Let me give you one clear example (among many) of the witness of Jesus’ deity in Mark, and then a clear fulfillment of a key prophetic picture from the Old Testament (because it is Prophesy Friday after all).

A Clear Example of Jesus’ Godhood

A paralytic guy needed to be healed, and he knew Jesus could do it. His friends brought him out to see Jesus, but instead of just *shazam* healing the man, Jesus says “Son, your sins are forgiven you” (Mark 2:5b NKJV).

Now, the folks in the house knew exactly what kind of claim that was, “and some of the scribes were sitting there and reasoning in their hearts, ‘Why does this Man speak blasphemies like this? Who can forgive sins but God alone?'” (Mark 2:6-7).

Got it? Every Jew knows that only God forgives sins.

Also, note that the scribes were reasoning in their hearts – not out loud. Watch this.

But immediately, when Jesus perceived in His spirit that they reasoned thus within themselves, He said to them, “Why do you reason about these things in your hearts? Which is easier, to say to the paralytic, ‘Your sins are forgiven you,’ or to say, ‘Arise, take up your bed and walk’? But that you may know that the Son of Man has power on earth to forgive sins”—He said to the paralytic,“I say to you, arise, take up your bed, and go to your house.”Immediately he arose, took up the bed, and went out in the presence of them all, so that all were amazed and glorified God, saying, “We never saw anything like this!” (Mark 2:8-12)

Jesus did not shy away from the claim to be God in flesh. He proved it.

Jesus Claims to be Fulfilling Prophecy

He isn’t done. A few years and 12 chapters later, the high priest is interrogating Jesus, who has been arrested and is facing charges of.. blasphemy. So he snarls at Jesus “Are You the Christ, the Son of the Blessed?” (Mark 14:61b).Trial

He doesn’t really think it possible that Jesus is the Christ (Messiah) – it’s a question meant to lead to execution. The answer, however, is not that of an intimidated man. He isn’t scared of death, or the authority of the high priest.

Jesus said, “I am…”

Step 1: use the designation that belongs to God alone. Exodus 3:14.

“…and you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of the Power,”

Step 2: claim to be the divine figure from Psalm 110:1 who has the rightful place of authority at the right hand of God.

“…and coming with the clouds of heaven.”

Step 3: claim to be the figure from Daniel 7:13-14 who inherits the universe as His own creation and right. Claim to be the Son of Man who was prophesied over 500 years before – the One who stands above the creation as its Master. Jesus was not afraid to die for the truth.

-Cue the wrath of the little inquisitor-

Then the high priest tore his clothes and said, “What further need do we have of witnesses? You have heard the blasphemy! What do you think?”

And they all condemned Him to be deserving of death.

Then some began to spit on Him, and to blindfold Him, and to beat Him, and to say to Him, “Prophesy!” And the officers struck Him with the palms of their hands (Mark 14:63-65).

Now that is a Man who knows His identity. He is not trembling before the opinions of His enemies. He has no hesitation to claim the divine rights He has always owned, from all eternity. He has no problem claiming that the Bible is all about Himself. Do you know Him?

Thanks for reading,

-Justin

Martin Luther on the Chief Doctrine of Christianity

Martin Luther (b. November 10, 1483 – d. February 18, 1546) was enlightened to the doctrine of justification when as an Augustinian friar he read Romans 1:17 by the light of the Holy Spirit:

For in [the gospel] the righteousness of God is revealed from faith to faith; as it is written, “The just shall live by faith” (NKJV).

This most precious truth gave him freedom from the condemnation of the Law of God, and also gave freedom to love God for the first time. Under a tormented conscience, Martin had been a frequent visitor to the confessional booth, but never seemed to be able to get true assurance that God had forgiven him (though he regarded private absolution highly). The day he found the gospel there in Romans 1:16-17, he was freed from the fear of condemnation and became the great hero of the Protestant Reformation – restoring light to the Bible for the peoples of Europe. (Yes, that was a simplified version)…

And so we thank God for this (very flawed) man, through whom the chief doctrine of the Christian life was restored to the Church. On this topic, Luther bluntly states

This is the true meaning of Christianity, that we are justified by faith in Christ, not by the works of the Law. This is the highest article of our faith, and if one should abandon it as the Jews do or pervert it like the papists, the church cannot stand nor can God maintain His glory, which consists in this, that He might be merciful and that He desires to pardon sins for His Son’s sake and to save. If this doctrine of justification is lost, the whole Christian doctrine is lost.

This doctrine can never be urged and taught enough. If this doctrine is overthrown or disappears, then all knowledge of the truth is lost at the same time. If this doctrine flourishes, then all good things flourish, religion, true worship, the glory of God, and the right knowledge of all conditions of life and of all things. [1]

So let us defend to our deaths the doctrine of God’s justification of sinners, based solely on the merits of Christ’s life, penal substitutionary death, and resurrection for our justification. By grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone, to the glory of God alone, revealed in Scripture alone. That is our Reformation heritage.

Thanks for reading,

-Justin

[1] Martin Luther quoted by Robert D. Preus in Luther and the Doctrine of Justification, Concordia Theological Quarterly, vol. 48, num. 1 (Fort Wayne, IN: Concordia Theological Seminary, 1984), 1.

Prophesy Fridays: Isaiah Sees the Atonement 740 Years Out

I am pretty sure the internet is devoid of commentary on prophecy, so I’d better throw in a dash of red-hot, mind-blowing prophetic power to light up your mental mouth.

Hot Peppers

Be sure to subscribe to the Citizen on the right side column to get an e-mail when a new post is published.

…the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy. Rev. 19:10

Let’s strengthen our mutual faith together, brothers and sisters. Foresight and clarity of Bible prophecy is one of (if not the) greatest means of growing in our faith in the true God. Isaiah wrote over 700 years before Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection, but he wrote so clearly about Him that we might suspect old Isaiah had been the first time traveler.

How did he see Jesus so clearly from seven centuries before?

This is the signature of the divine Holy Spirit, guiding and carrying the authors of the biblical text, and should be more than enough “evidence” for each of us to bow the knee in repentance from sins, faith and trust in the magnificent, mighty Lord Jesus Christ. Let’s look at Isaiah 25:6-9, where the prophecy of the atonement is clear, glorious, and weighty.

What do you see, Isaiah?

I see…

On this mountain Yahweh Almighty will prepare
a feast of rich food for all peoples, (the body of Jesus upon which we feast at communion)
a banquet of aged wine— (the blood of Jesus which we drink in at communion)
the best of meats and the finest of wines. (there is no sacrifice and meal like His)
On this mountain he will destroy (Jerusalem = “this mountain” where Jesus died)
the shroud that enfolds all peoples, (spiritual darkness over the nations)
the sheet that covers all nations;
    he will swallow up death forever. (when the Son of God died for the sins of the world!)
The Sovereign Lord will wipe away the tears
from all faces;
he will remove the disgrace of his people
from all the earth. (reconciliation has been achieved in the body of Jesus for all peoples)
Yahweh has spoken. (it is as good as accomplished)

In that day they will say,

“Surely this is our God;
we trusted in him, and he saved us.
This is Yahweh, we trusted in him;
let us rejoice and be glad in his salvation” (NIV 1984). (and so it is – all these things have come to pass)

Do you see Him there? Do you see the Son of God in flesh, taking on the sins of the world, dying in your place? If you see Him, be baptized in His Name for the forgiveness of your sins, and rise to take the bread and wine of the communion supper with the rest of His people. We will be with Him in the New Jerusalem, beloved. Rejoice!

We’ve been peppered by the prophet.

Thanks for reading,

-Justin

P.S. I recommend milk or bread for cooling a spicy, burning mouth.